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Noncommercial

Commercial

Noncommercial

Commercial

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Africa

Asia

Europe

North America

Oceana

South America

Figure 2.11 Trends in growing stock of forest from 1990-2005 in six different regions of the world (FAO 2005). Upper column area indicates noncommercial forests; the bottom part depicts commercial forests. As with forest area, the tropics have seen decreases in total growing stock, while growing stocks have increased or were stable elsewhere. Commercial growing stocks were mostly stable, except for a large decrease in Europe. Africa and South America have the greatest amounts of noncommercial forest.

depending on the region (Houghton and Hackler 1995), these recovery times imply that current rates of removal are unsustainable, or that noncommercial forests will need to be brought into timber management. Note, however, that there is an important caveat to this analysis. According to the FAO (2006a):

900 800' 700 600' 500 400 300 200 100

Fuelwood

Industrial roundwood

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Africa

Asia

Europe

North America

Oceana

South America

Figure 2.12 Trends in wood removal rates from 1990-2005 in six different regions of the world (FAO 2005). Upper column area indicates fuelwood; the lower area depicts industrial roundwood.

Table 2.4 Growing stocks and removals in 2005, and estimated forest recovery time.

Growing stock Recovery time based on

Growing stock Recovery time based on

Table 2.4 Growing stocks and removals in 2005, and estimated forest recovery time.

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