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These figures are indicative, and the figures on removals should not be directly compared with figures on growing stock, particularly at the country level. Removals take place partially outside forests, e.g., in other wooded land and from trees outside forests—particularly fuelwood removals in developing countries—while growing stock estimates refer only to forest area.

These figures are indicative, and the figures on removals should not be directly compared with figures on growing stock, particularly at the country level. Removals take place partially outside forests, e.g., in other wooded land and from trees outside forests—particularly fuelwood removals in developing countries—while growing stock estimates refer only to forest area.

This will result in underestimates of recovery time. Earlier in the report, however, the FAO states that "countries usually do not report illegal removals and informal fuelwood gathering, so figures for removals might be much higher." This will result in an overestimate of recovery times.

Although the FAO cautions against comparing removals to growing stocks at the country level, a few illustrative examples could provide some insight (Table 2.5). The U.S.A. has a range of recovery times between 51-65 years, which is fairly short. Brazil has a recovery time of only 51 years for commercial forests alone, but 280 years if all forests are considered. The recovery times in India and Gabon are ~1000 years or above because of their low wood removal rates. The inclusion of "other wooded land" in Russia and China (the only countries in our list that reported a value) makes minimal difference to the estimated recovery times. Canada, which has a very elaborate forest management policy, appears to have planned for a ~150-year recovery time for its forests.

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