Coral harvesting

Corals are mined in many places to provide a source of cheap building materials and rubble for roads and air strips, especially in remote locations where transport costs are high. Massive corals like Porites are

Figure 9.6 Loss of corals from bleaching also impacts on fishes. Here, juvenile reef fishes stay close to bleached colonies of Acropora and Pocillopora from the 2006 bleaching event in the Keppel Islands (southern Great Barrier Reef). If the corals die, recruitment by fishes will diminish. (Photo: O. Hoegh-Guldberg.)

Figure 9.6 Loss of corals from bleaching also impacts on fishes. Here, juvenile reef fishes stay close to bleached colonies of Acropora and Pocillopora from the 2006 bleaching event in the Keppel Islands (southern Great Barrier Reef). If the corals die, recruitment by fishes will diminish. (Photo: O. Hoegh-Guldberg.)

collected and cut into building blocks. Coral fragments are widely collected for lime preparation (for making cement and for the consumption of beetel nut). Coral mining was widespread on the GBR prior to World War II, particularly as a source of lime for sugar cane farming.

Live and dead coral collecting for the ornamental, souvenir and aquarium trade is widespread, and has led to significant reef damage in the Philippines and elsewhere. All scleractinian corals are classified by the UN Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) as 'endangered', and in theory they cannot be traded internationally without import and export licenses. There is a very small coral fishery on the GBR that is sustainable and tightly regulated.

Worm Farming

Worm Farming

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