Info

living components terminal living components

FIGURE 2.6 Food web diagram of a trickling filter ecosystem. (From Cooke, W.G. 1959. Ecology. 40:273-291. With permission.)

Insects

Flies

Insects

Flies

Humus Sludge

FIGURE 2.7 Trophic pyramid diagram of a trickling filter ecosystem. (From Hawkes, H.A. 1963. The Ecology of Waste Water Treatment. Macmillan, New York. With permission.)

Humus Sludge

FIGURE 2.7 Trophic pyramid diagram of a trickling filter ecosystem. (From Hawkes, H.A. 1963. The Ecology of Waste Water Treatment. Macmillan, New York. With permission.)

The trickling filter is a fascinating ecosystem because of its ecological complexity and its well-known engineering details. Interestingly, Mitsch (1990), in a passing reference, suggested that some of the new constructed treatment wetlands have many characteristics of "horizontal trickling filters." Perhaps a detailed study of the old

S Excess Bacteria

FIGURE 2.8 Metabolic cycling that takes place in oxidation stabilization ponds during wastewater treatment. (Adapted from Oswald, W. J. 1963. Advances in Biological Waste Treatment. W. W. Eckenfelder, Jr. and J. McCabe (eds.). MacMillan, New York.)

S Excess Bacteria

FIGURE 2.8 Metabolic cycling that takes place in oxidation stabilization ponds during wastewater treatment. (Adapted from Oswald, W. J. 1963. Advances in Biological Waste Treatment. W. W. Eckenfelder, Jr. and J. McCabe (eds.). MacMillan, New York.)

trickling filter literature will provide useful design information for future work on treatment wetlands.

Other treatment systems have evolved that have more direct similarity to wetlands (Dinges, 1982). Oxidation or waste stabilization lagoons are simply shallow pools in which sewage is broken down with long retention times (Gloyna et al., 1976; Mandt and Bell, 1982; Middlebrooks et al., 1982). This is a very effective technique that relies on biotic metabolism for wastewater treatment (Figure 2.8). Perhaps even closer to the wetland option is land treatment in which sewage is simply sprayed over soil in a grassland or forest (Sanks and Asano, 1976; Sopper and Kardos, 1973; Sopper and Kerr, 1979). In this system sewage is treated as it filters through the soil by physical, chemical, and biological processes.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Growing Soilless

Growing Soilless

This is an easy-to-follow, step-by-step guide to growing organic, healthy vegetable, herbs and house plants without soil. Clearly illustrated with black and white line drawings, the book covers every aspect of home hydroponic gardening.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment