Effects Of Basidiomycete Litter Mats On Erosion

Litter mat formation by basidiomycete decomposers benefits tropical forest ecosystems as a whole, both by conserving nutrients against leaching losses (Lodge, 1993; Lodge et al., 1994) and by reducing erosion (Lodge and Asbury, 1988; Lodge et al., 1994). The presence of basidiomycetes reduced downhill litter

Basidiomycete Species Figure 6 Mean weekly rates of leaf attachment by mycelia of four decomposer basidiomycetes in full and partial shades at El Verde in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. Mycelia were grown in baskets (18 cm x 25 cm) filled with a thin layer of old fallen leaves or twigs lacking basidiomycetes, then the mats followed by freshly fallen leaves or more twigs on the top. Control treatments were constructed similarly, but without the mats (these remained free of fungal attachments). Every week during June 2006, the number of attached and unattached leaves or twigs in each basket were counted, followed by addition of freshly fallen leaves and twigs. Mean weekly attachment rates were compared using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's adjusted LSD comparisons. The overall two-way ANOVA for attachment rates was significant (P — 0.0025) and differences were found among species (P — 0.009), but not light environments (P — 0.548).

Basidiomycete Species Figure 6 Mean weekly rates of leaf attachment by mycelia of four decomposer basidiomycetes in full and partial shades at El Verde in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. Mycelia were grown in baskets (18 cm x 25 cm) filled with a thin layer of old fallen leaves or twigs lacking basidiomycetes, then the mats followed by freshly fallen leaves or more twigs on the top. Control treatments were constructed similarly, but without the mats (these remained free of fungal attachments). Every week during June 2006, the number of attached and unattached leaves or twigs in each basket were counted, followed by addition of freshly fallen leaves and twigs. Mean weekly attachment rates were compared using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's adjusted LSD comparisons. The overall two-way ANOVA for attachment rates was significant (P — 0.0025) and differences were found among species (P — 0.009), but not light environments (P — 0.548).

loss on steep slopes of a subtropical wet forest in Puerto Rico by up to 41% (Lodge and Asbury, 1988). Furthermore, the fungal litter mats protected soil surfaces from erosion losses of soil organic matter and nutrients, thereby maintaining soil fertility (Lodge and Asbury, 1988).

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