Effects of Soil Type on Wood Decay Fungi

As with plant community composition, the occurrence of terrestrial fungi is strongly influenced by soil type and chemistry (Tyler, 1985; Arnolds et al., 1994), but little is known of the effects on wood-inhabiting fungi. It is obvious that non-unit-restricted fungi, e.g. cord-formers, are directly influenced by the soil and litter environment through which they grow in search of new wood resources (e.g. Abdalla and Boddy, 1996; Donnelly and Boddy, 1998). Also, for

Timber Decay

Figure 1 Proportion of wood decay fungi that can be considered weakly or strongly selective or specific for host tree species, according to sporocarp surveys (from Heilmann-Clausen, 2003). Information was extracted from a dataset obtained from Draved Skov, Denmark, during 1999 and 2000. The site contained seven main angiosperm tree species.

Figure 1 Proportion of wood decay fungi that can be considered weakly or strongly selective or specific for host tree species, according to sporocarp surveys (from Heilmann-Clausen, 2003). Information was extracted from a dataset obtained from Draved Skov, Denmark, during 1999 and 2000. The site contained seven main angiosperm tree species.

Table 2 Host ranges in Peniophora species growing on deciduous hosts in scandinavia

Apparently host specific Host selective Broad host range

Table 2 Host ranges in Peniophora species growing on deciduous hosts in scandinavia

Apparently host specific Host selective Broad host range

P. eriksonii (Alnus)

P. cinerea (mostly Fagus)

P. incarnata (deciduous,

less often coniferous

hosts)

P. hydnoidea (Carpinus)

P. laurentii (Populus

P. lycii (deciduous

tremula and Betula)

hosts)

P. lilacea (Ulmus

P. limitata (mostly

P. nuda (deciduous

carpinifolia)

Fraxinus, Syringa and

hosts)

Ligustrum)

P. polygonia (Populus

P. quercina (Fagus and

P. suecica (deciduous

tremula)

Quercus)

hosts)

P. rufa (Populus tremula)

P. violaceolivida (mostly

Salix and Populus)

P. rufomarginata (Tilia)

Source: Based on data in Hansen and Knudsen (1997).

Source: Based on data in Hansen and Knudsen (1997).

soil-borne tree pathogens, e.g. Armillaria spp., Heterobasidion annosum and Collybia fusipes, soil conditions influence infection incidence (Camy et al., 2003; Thor et al., 2005). However, the extent to which unit-restricted wood decay fungi are affected by soil type and chemistry is uncertain. Effects would be largely indirect; wood chemistry and structure (e.g. year ring widths) are affected by soil chemistry and general growth conditions (Sundberg et al., 1993), and a recent study from coniferous wood has indicated that these might affect fungal species composition (Edman et al, 2006).

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