Acknowledgments

Most of this work has been funded by the Hudson River Foundation, through research grants, the

Tibor T. Polgar Fellowship Program, and the Hudson River Improvement Fund. We greatly appreciate this support and the individual encouragement we have received from the people that make the Hudson River Foundation work.

We did not do this work by ourselves. Although we enjoy being out on the Hudson River and its tributaries, not all of the people that accompanied us shared our enthusiasm, but they persevered. Producing a list of people who have physically helped us in the fifteen to twenty years it has taken for us to form our ideas would inevitably leave people out, so we will not do so. You know who you are, and we deeply appreciate your help. Additionally, this book chapter does not signal an end to our involvement in the Hudson River or its tributaries. There is plenty of opportunity for you to accompany us again.

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