Conclusion

Recognizing that there has been a historical association of women and other oppressed groups with nature within western patriarchal contexts encourages us to look at the complex social forces that cause human domination of nature and human oppression of other humans. It encourages us to recognize the way that race, class, and social location play into who benefits and who pays the costs of environmental degradation. Most importantly, it forces us to see that humans are not one category that must take responsibility to end environmental degradation. Rather, we need to look specifically at which groups of humans are benefitting, and which groups are paying the cost. This is much more challenging than simply asserting that humans need to stop degrading our planet, which often turns up in mainstream work in environmental ethics, and has been highly criticized by ecological feminists.

See also: Biological Integrity; Dominance; Ecological Systems Thinking; Endocrine Disruptor Chemicals: Overview; Endocrine Disruptors: effect in Wildlife and Laboratory Animals; Environmental Impact Assessment and Application - Part 1; Environmental Impact Assessment and Application - Part 2; Environmental Protection and Ecology; Social Behavior.

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