Key Global and Regional Results

At the largest scales, global Ecological Footprint analysis shows that the total human footprint, or demand on ecosystems, exceeds the planet's available biocapacity, or its ability to supply resources and waste sinks. Figure 1 shows that this condition of overshoot has existed since the mid-1980s. The most significant growth in Ecological Footprint over this time period has been a result of an increase in the productive land area required to meet human demands for fossil fuel energy. This energy land footprint made up nearly 50% of the total Ecological Footprint at a global level in 2002. The growth in available biocapacity over time largely reflects increases in the productivity of cropland. These increases also led, however, to increases in application of fertilizers and pesticides, the creation of which contributed to the rapidly growing Ecological Footprint over this same time period.

These consistently growing global trends, however, mask significant regional variation (Figure 2). In 2002, the per person Ecological Footprint of North America and Western Europe was more than double the biological capacity available within those regions. If everyone in the world lived with a level of ecological demand equal to the typical North American or western European, humanity would require the equivalent production of three to five planets. Other regions, such as Asia Pacific, have an average level of ecological demand that could be extended globally without causing overshoot.

Levels of demand also vary significantly between high-, middle-, and low-income countries (Figure 3). In 2002, high-income countries had an average Ecological Footprint of 6.4 global hectares, compared to 1.8 global hectares for middle-income nations and 0.8 global hectares

0 1961

North America Western Europe Central/eastern Europe Middle East and Central Asia Latin America Asia Pacific

www.footprintnetwork.org."/>
Figure 2 Regional Ecological Footprint and biocapacity, 2002. From Global Footprint Network (2005). National Footprint Accounts, 2005 edition. Available at http:// www.footprintnetwork.org.

1961

1971

1981

1991

2001

Figure 3 Ecological Footprint and biocapacity by national income grouping, 1961-2002. Dotted lines indicate discontinuities due to lack of data. From Global Footprint Network (2005). National Footprint Accounts, 2005 edition. Available at http://www.footprintnetwork.org.

1961

1971

1981

1991

2001

1971

1981

1991

2001

Figure 3 Ecological Footprint and biocapacity by national income grouping, 1961-2002. Dotted lines indicate discontinuities due to lack of data. From Global Footprint Network (2005). National Footprint Accounts, 2005 edition. Available at http://www.footprintnetwork.org.

for low-income nations. Over the past 40 years, consumption of ecological resources, per capita, has increased by nearly 90% in high-income countries but fallen by 15% in low-income countries.

More detailed national-level footprint results are published in annual editions by Global Footprint Network. A wide range of subnational footprint assessments have also been completed by organizations located throughout the world. Links to these data sets and reports are available on Global Footprint Network's website (http:// www.footprintnetwork.org).

Oplan Termites

Oplan Termites

You Might Start Missing Your Termites After Kickin'em Out. After All, They Have Been Your Roommates For Quite A While. Enraged With How The Termites Have Eaten Up Your Antique Furniture? Can't Wait To Have Them Exterminated Completely From The Face Of The Earth? Fret Not. We Will Tell You How To Get Rid Of Them From Your House At Least. If Not From The Face The Earth.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment