Estimate rate per rate per individual in numbers per billions thousand thousandyear millions

1981

0.25

16

9

0.007

1.76

1985

0.26

15

8

0.007

1.83

1987

0.27

15

9

0.006

1.62

1989

0.27

16

9

0.007

1.90

1991

0.28

16

9

0.007

1.97

1995

0.29

15

9

0.006

1.75

2000

0.31

14

8

0.006

1.86

2003

0.323

14

8

0.005

1.62

a peak in 1990 at 87 million per year. Population Reference Bureau data agree on the time but not the number (over 100 million added in the period 1987-89). Absolute growth has averaged about 87 million per year in the latter part of the twentieth century, according to Population Reference Bureau data; Lomborg used the figure of 76 million, but this applies only to the 1990s. The 2003 Population Reference Bureau data sheet projects world population as 7.9 billion in 2025 and 9.2 billion in 2050. Lomborg's comparable numbers are "almost 8 billion" in 2025 and 9.3 billion in 2050.

Population growth in North America (Table 1.4) is rather variable, but reached a relative peak in 1991-92 when around two million people were added to the population per year. The data from 2003, however, reflect the fact that the 2000 census for the United States came in at almost seven million more than expected. Meanwhile, the US birth rate has fallen to 2.034 births per female (replacement rate is 2.10 births per female) (PRB, Anonymous 1981-2004).

Human population growth is greatest in Asia (Table 1.5). Peak absolute growth was in the period 1989-91, when around 58 million people were added per year. It declined unsteadily in the late twentieth century and is now about 50 million people per year. The r-value has declined steadily to 0.013 in 2003.

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