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ABN-AMRO Bank World Headquarters, Amsterdam, Netherlands Adeline Street Urban Salvage Project, Berkeley, California BigHorn Home Improvement Center, Silverthorne, Colorado Chesapeake Bay Foundation Headquarters, Annapolis, Maryland REI Denver, Denver, Colorado

Montgomery Campus, California College of Arts and Crafts, San Francisco, California

Nidus Center for Scientific Enterprise, Creve Coeur, Missouri PNC Firstside Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Sleeping Lady Conference and Retreat Center, Leavenworth, Washington Zion National Park Visitor Center, Springdale, Utah

The Nidus Center for Scientific Enterprise by Hellmuth Obata + Kassabaum (HOK) is a 41,000-square-foot plant and life sciences business incubator sponsored by Monsanto and located on its Creve Coeur research campus.

The Nidus Center's aggressive energy efficiency exceeds ASHRAE/IES requirements by 33 percent.

The Nidus Center for Scientific Enterprise by Hellmuth Obata + Kassabaum (HOK) is a 41,000-square-foot plant and life sciences business incubator sponsored by Monsanto and located on its Creve Coeur research campus.

The Nidus Center's aggressive energy efficiency exceeds ASHRAE/IES requirements by 33 percent.

2001 AIA/COTE Top Ten Winner CHESAPEAKE BAY FOUNDATION HEADQUARTERS LOCATION: Annapolis, Maryland ARCHITECT: Smith Group

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation is dedicated to protecting and preserving the environment. Its mission and dedication to that mission drove the design and inspired the design team. The client was a major participant in all design decisions and encouraged the design team to constantly "push the envelope."

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation is dedicated to protecting and preserving the environment. That mission drove the design and inspired the design team.

Building Performance, According to the Architects

In general, the project is performing extremely well and as good if not better than expected. Some aspects of the energy usage are not exactly as anticipated (e.g., there is a slightly higher plug draw of electricity); but the systems have performed very well. Extensive and ongoing studies of the building energy profile have been done by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (www.nrel.gov/) and are publicly available.

Lessons Learned by the Architects

■ Better care must be taken in fully understanding (and detailing) the exterior components (sun screens, structure, building skin). The effectiveness of some systems is heavily affected by occupant use (heavier plug loads than previous). The integrated-design approach worked extremely well, and this needs to be utilized on other such projects for maximum effectiveness and efficiency.

■ We don't necessarily utilize the LEED system on every project, but the education and experience gained by LEED-accredited professionals and LEED-registered projects is invaluable to their other work.

2001 AIA/COTE Top Ten Winner REI DENVER

LOCATION: Denver, Colorado ARCHITECT: Mithun

As part of the design process, REI consulted its members to help define key priorities to use in developing the Denver flagship store. The top priorities identified by the members were energy efficiency, alternative-transit options, water conservation, and sustainable building and operating principles, such as recycling.

The top priorities identified by REI members were energy efficiency, alternativetransit options, water conservation, and sustainable building and operating principles, such as recycling.

The top priorities identified by REI members were energy efficiency, alternativetransit options, water conservation, and sustainable building and operating principles, such as recycling.

At REI Denver, reclaimed wood timbers, salvaged from an abandoned mine, were used for stair supports, and reclaimed wood decking was used for a new second-floor structure.

Energy Features

■ Mechanical system uses direct and indirect, evaporative water-cooling system to reduce energy consumption during summer months.

Energy savings are due to greater temperature spread performance requirements and variable-speed HVAC fans, resulting in temperature variances of up to 5 degrees Fahrenheit off optimum within the store.

■ Natural daylighting is used extensively throughout the building.

■ Large skylights within the great room allow ambient lighting to shut off when natural daylight reaches required levels.

■ Carbon monoxide sensors activate garage exhaust fans only when needed.

■ Motion sensors detect occupancy for lighting usage after hours.

■ There are no escalators.

■ High-efficiency metal halide and fluorescent lighting is used within the building.

■ Computer-controlled energy-management system is used.

■ There are extensive bike racks for customers and employees, with employee showers to encourage bike use.

■ Transportation plan encourages employee use of alternative transportation sources.

Materials

■ Reclaimed wood timbers, salvaged from an abandoned mine, were used for stair supports. Reclaimed wood decking was used for new second-floor structure.

■ New stone was employed that involved no active quarrying. It was instead selected from a washed-out earthen dam.

■ Large sandstone foundations discovered during site excavations were used for new landscaping and fireplace.

■ Limited use of internal coatings, and the steel and wood structure inside the building was left raw with no stain or coating on structural wood and much of the wood paneling.

■ Wood structure used engineered lumber available from small-diameter trees.

■ Engineered-wood panel products from postindustrial waste (medium-density fiberboard, or MDF, and OSB, oriented-strand board) were used for wall elements, cabinets, and merchandise fixtures.

■ Wood flooring came from certified sustainable forest sources.

■ Native Colorado landscaping, with a high-efficiency subsurface irrigation system, reduces water consumption.

Keeping Items from Waste Stream

By using and recycling an existing structure, an overwhelming quantity of new material was not used; material that ordinarily would be sent to a landfill was reused. Other methods used to keep items from entering the waste stream included the use of the following methods and practices:

■ A construction recycling program and store operation recycling program were established.

■ Exterior-treated timbers and shoring lagging utilized environmentally friendly, low-VOC preservatives.

■ Countertops used recycled newspaper and soybean composite (Phoenix Bio Composite).

■ Concrete had a high fly-ash content, a waste byproduct of coal-generated power plants.

■ Landscape uses composted urban green waste.

■ Steel, which typically consists of more than 65 percent recycled content in the United States, was used throughout the building.

■ The art program anticipates using recycled glass and salvaged steel panels.

■ Salvaged timbers and decking were used within the retail space.

Lessons Learned by the Architects

■ The advancement and availability of sustainable materials would have opened us to new possibilities. We are more in tune today with sustainable issues having to do with water than when we started the design of the Seattle flagship store in 1993.

■ We learned the value of reusing an existing structure, and that designing a sustainable project while renovating a historic landmark is not only possible but also extremely rewarding.

■ We do much of our materials and methods research on our own, with the assistance of contractors, materials suppliers, and peers within the design profession. Ideally, better information would be available to design professionals in the critical area of life-cycle analysis.

2001 AIA/COTE Top Ten Winner

MONTGOMERY CAMPUS, CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF ARTS AND CRAFTS LOCATION: San Francisco, California ARCHITECT: Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects

After analyzing several different adaptive-reuse approaches for the existing structure, we convinced the client that incorporating sustainable strategies was not only consistent with its institutional and pedagogical missions but would also save hun-

Incorporating sustainable strategies was consistent with the CCAC's institutional and pedagogical mission, and also saved hundreds of thousands of dollars in both capital and operating expenses.

Incorporating sustainable strategies was consistent with the CCAC's institutional and pedagogical mission, and also saved hundreds of thousands of dollars in both capital and operating expenses.

dreds of thousands of dollars in both capital and operating expenses. Making the new project a "solar-heated art school" added fund-raising appeal and helped jump-start the capital campaign as well.

Building Performance, According to the Architects

The project continues to perform well for two reasons. First, the systems were designed to be very simple, requiring minimal maintenance. Second, the user is a school of architecture, art, and design, so the building is used as a teaching tool and is therefore well maintained.

Lessons Learned by the Architects

■ Because this was a very low-budget project, there were very few elements in play. The design benefited from the discipline of a limited budget.

The Montgomery Campus California College of Arts and Crafts building is used as a teaching tool and is therefore well maintained.

■ We would require more sustainable-construction practices and documentation from the contractor.

■ We would place more emphasis on natural-ventilation cooling strategies.

■ We would push harder for proper skylight sun- and glare-control devices.

■ Our basic approach to this project—that sustainable design fundamentally means making the most with the least—has not changed over the years. We strive for simplicity and elegance.

■ In our office, sustainable design is simply another way of saying good design. We don't segregate sustainable issues. We use LEED as a guide for every project. It helps both the design team and the client understand options and trade-offs, even if certification is not being sought. We currently have 7 LEED-accredited professionals in a firm of 18. We feel it adds to our knowledge base and communicates our commitment to our clients.

2001 AIA/COTE Top Ten Winner PNC FIRSTSIDE CENTER LOCATION: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ARCHITECT: Astorino

The client is a very forward-thinking company and was the prime motivator for sustainable design and LEED certification. The project team was together from

During peak-load periods, such as the summer, energy costs at PNC Firstside Center by Astorino are 50 percent lower than those of a conventional building.

During peak-load periods, such as the summer, energy costs at PNC Firstside Center by Astorino are 50 percent lower than those of a conventional building.

the beginning, including the owner, architect, engineer, and construction manager, so when the client decided to go for LEED certification, the team was already working together and could adjust plans accordingly. Major decisions were consensus-built.

Building Performance, According to the Architects

PNC Firstside is performing and operating better than originally expected. Studies have compared this facility with a virtually identical facility of the same size and function that was built with conventional systems and products. During peak-load periods, such as the summer, energy costs at PNC Firstside are 50 percent lower than the conventional building's. In addition, employee retention has improved 60 percent.

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