Exe

Table 2.8 (Continued)

1

2a

2b

2c

3

4

5

Material

Global warming potential GWP

Acidification potential AP

Poisons and ozone depleting substances

Waste category

Basic impact

Negative modifyers

Positive modifyers

[See Table 2.5]

[g CO2 -equ./kg]

[gCO2/kg]

[gCO2/kg]

[g SO2-equ/kg]

Porous boards, wet process

1600

-825

-

9

-

A/D

Porous boards, dry process

1300

-775

+90

4

54-73-6

B/D

Porous boards with bitumen

1400

-775

+300

10

12

B/D

Hard boards

1500

-825

-

5

72-31

A/D

Woodwool cement slabs

1600

-400

-

5

78-30-85

D

Chipboard

700

-775

+200

2.5

72-45

B/D

Plywood

750

-825

+ 100

0.5

72-45

B/D

Flax fibre

Matting glued with polyolefin/ polyester fibres

1650

-700

+450

11

15-43

B/D

Linoleum

1020

-400

-

1.5

94

B/D

Hemp fibre

Matting glued with polyolefin/polyester

1400

-775

+300

13

43

B/D

Straw bales

5

-800

-

-

A/D

Cellulose

Loose fill 100% recycled

230

-800

-

2.2

45

D

Matting from fresh fibre, glued with polyolefin/polyester

1600

-775

+300

12

43

B/D

Building paper, 98% recycled

300

-825

-

0.3

-

A/D

Building paper with bitumen

320

-750

+600

12

B/D

Cardboard sheeting

Laminated with polyvinyl acetate

400

-775

+ 100

-

B/D

Wool

Matting glued with polyester

500

+300

5.5

43-15-77

B/D

Recycled textiles

Matting glued with polyester

1320

-325

+300

3

43

B/D

Note: The table is compiled and based on many sources, a.o. Kohler etal., 1994; Weibel etal., 1995; Fossdal, 1995; Gielen, 1997; Mötzl et al., 2000; Krogh etal., 2001; Pommer etal., 2001; Thormark, 2001; Nemry, 2001; Fossdal, 2003; Buschmann, 2003; Jochem et al., 2004; IBO, 2006; Möhlethaler et al., 2006; Hammond et al., 2006; Schmidt, 2006.

Note: The table is compiled and based on many sources, a.o. Kohler etal., 1994; Weibel etal., 1995; Fossdal, 1995; Gielen, 1997; Mötzl et al., 2000; Krogh etal., 2001; Pommer etal., 2001; Thormark, 2001; Nemry, 2001; Fossdal, 2003; Buschmann, 2003; Jochem et al., 2004; IBO, 2006; Möhlethaler et al., 2006; Hammond et al., 2006; Schmidt, 2006.

POLLUTION

RULES OF READING (TABLE 2.8)

The overall scope of the table is Cradle-to-Gate.The raw materials are harvested until the products are ready to be sent from the factory. Cradle-to-site can be estimated by combining with info from Table 2.2. The tables are also supplied with hot spots from Site-to-Grave and will therefore give a rough picture of the total impact through the life cycle of products.

Empty squares indicate that adequate information is missing and '-' signify that specification is irrelevant.

AD COLUMNS

Colu mn 1. Based on the most common product compositions. Alternative glues and additives can change the picture substantially. Column 2a.Based on conventional production withfossilfuels and electricity from the municipal grid in OECD-countries. In certain trades, such as the timber industry, the use of biomass for energy production is substantial.This is not reflected in the estimates. Column 2 b. Quantifies the effect of storing carbon in vegetable products and the effect of carbonatation in products based on calcined lime during a period of 50 years see pages 32-34.The latter is estimated to 25% (of the initial chemical emissions from the calcinations processes) in concrete constructions, 50% in sheet products and plasters with Portland cement and 80% in sheet products and plasters with lime. Column 2c. Quantifies the additional effect of the final waste incineration of products based on fossil raw materials.

Column 4.Indicates hazardous substances that can be found in production and/or in the finished product. Particular brands can be less polluting.The numbers are referring to the first column inTable2.5.

Column 5.Wastecategories:

A. Incineration without purification/composting B Incineration with purification C Landfill D. Ordinary tip E Special tip F Strictly controlled tip

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