Recipes For Linseed Oil Paints And Treatments

Linseed oil products can be used both inside and outside. For interior use on walls and ceilings, linseed oil emulsions are a better choice because of the short drying time and avoidance of organic solvents. Linseed oil paints are particularly goodfor interior mouldings and external walls made of timber panelling.This paint type swells in damp weather, creating an elastic film that never completely hardens. When linseed oil has set, it is quite porous to water vapour and allows moisture to evaporate.The choice of pigment is important if the paint is going to retain these properties. Zinc white should not be used as an outdoor pigment. It is easily washed out by acid, rain and dew and, when exposed to ultraviolet radiation, the paint starts cracking, especially on a south-facing surface.

RECIPE 1: LINSEED OIL PAINT FOR OUTDOOR USE

To start mixing linseed oil paints, a colour paste is prepared.The pigment must be thoroughly mixed to an even consistency with a small amount of linseed oil added. The amount of pigment to oil depends upon how transparent and shiny the paint is to be; more pigment will give a more matt paint.

The first coat usually contains about 15% vegetable turpentine to help the oil penetrate the substrate.The final coat does not need solvents, especially if cold pressed oil is used. Adding solvents to the paint generally shortens its lifespan.

RECIPE 2: LINSEED OIL TREATMENT OF TIMBER FLOORS

The floor should be sanded.The first coat usually consists of a mixture of mineral spirits or turpentine with boiled linseed oil or stand oil intheproportions1:1and inthefinal coat in the proportions 1:2. After application, all excess oil should be dried of after 20 to 30 minutes.

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