Turf Constructions

Basic info is found in Chapter 10.

Structural walls of turf were once widely used in coastal regions of Northern Europe, such as in Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Iceland. Building in turf was also undertaken by immigrants to North America, especially amongst the Mormons who worked a great deal with this material after 1850. There are still a few turf houses in Iceland.

Turf has many qualities, especially with respect to thermal insulation, but is no easy material to build with, and most of the alternatives such as timber, stone, concrete and earth are more durable

13.52

Traditional Icelandic dwelling with turf walls. Source: Dag Roalkvam.

13.53

A turf wall contains layers of turf with earth between them. In the corners stren-gur turf is used; the rest of the wall is laid with knaus. Source: Bruun, 1907.

13.53

A turf wall contains layers of turf with earth between them. In the corners stren-gur turf is used; the rest of the wall is laid with knaus. Source: Bruun, 1907.

and stable. But the question of economy and access to resources is also important.

A well-built turf house can have a lifespan of approximately 50 years, when the decomposition of turf will reach its critical point. Given good maintenance some examples have had a much longer lifespan. The durability is generally higher in colder climate.

Icelanders worked with two qualities of turf, which they call strengur and knaus.

0 0

Post a comment