Types Of Wooden Cladding

Exterior horizontal panelling is the best choice in exposed coastal areas (Figure 15.23). Driving rain runs off more easily and has difficulty getting behind the panelling.Theboardsshouldbecutsothatthestrongerheartwood isfacing outwards. When mounting the panelling, the best quality boarding should be furthest down, where the panels are exposed to most water and to splashing from the ground.

Exterior vertical panelling. Driving rain can penetrate vertical cladding easily so this type of cladding is more suited to inland buildings. It is an advantage to have the

Exterior vertical panelling. Driving rain can penetrate vertical cladding easily so this type of cladding is more suited to inland buildings. It is an advantage to have the

Horizontal panelling. Type (b) and (c) are less well ventilated sideways and should not be used in wet and windy locations. Source: Norwegian Building Research Institute, 2000.

15.23

Horizontal panelling. Type (b) and (c) are less well ventilated sideways and should not be used in wet and windy locations. Source: Norwegian Building Research Institute, 2000.

Vertical panelling. Type (d) is less suited in wet and windy locations. Source: Norwegian Building Research Institute, 2000.

15.24

Vertical panelling. Type (d) is less suited in wet and windy locations. Source: Norwegian Building Research Institute, 2000.

heart sidefacing the outside in all exterior panelling. It is also a good principle to lay the boarding the same way as it has grown, because the root end has the most heartwood (Figure15.24).

Exterior diagonal panelling is popularonthe continent, especially in central and Eastern Europe, because cut-offends of boarding and shorter pieces of board can be used. In very harsh climates, diagonal panelling should not be used, since water does not run of as well as from other types of panelling.

Interior panellingThe strength of timber is not so critical for internal use. Quickly grown timber serves most purposes. Softwoods are most commonly used, both as spruce and pine. Hardwoods can also be used. Birch is quite abrasion proof; aspen has a soft surface and a relatively good insulation value, and is often used in saunas. Because of its lasting light colour, it is also attractive as a ceiling. Other hardwoods appropriate for interior panelling are oak, ash, elm, lime and alder. Alder is particularly good for bathrooms because it tolerates changes between very damp and very dry conditions without cracking.

To reduce dust accumulating on walls, vertical panelling should be preferred. Interior panelling can best be re-used if it can be removed without damage, and should be fixed so that it is easily removable.

Shakes and shingles can be mounted onto the exterior walls following the same method as for roof ing.The problem of water gathering is much less, and the lifespan is

Alder Contemporary Cladding

15.25

Modern version of rebated shiplap panelling.

therefore longer.The oldest known preserved shingles are to be found on the walls of Borgund Stave church in Norway. They have been regularly painted every fourth year with wood tar since the thirteenth century.

Wattle walling is a construction of woven branches that has been used since prehistoric times. The dimensions of the plant material used can vary a great deal. The key to working it is elasticity. If the branches are flexible enough, they can be plaited on polesfor several metres.There are two types of wattling: rough and light wattlework.

Rough wattlework has been done in birch, ash, pussy willow and rowan.Thebarkis removed and the ends burned until they are black, achieving a sort of impregnation. The usual length of branches to be plaited is about 3-4 m. Poles are fixed between the top and bottom plates of a wall at a distance of about 50 to 60 cm, then the branchesarewoveninbetweensothatthetopendsandrootendsalternate.The layers are regularly pushed down to make them compact. Weaving can also be vertical, on battens fixed between vertical studwork.

In Denmarkand further south in Europe, this wattlework is used as an underlay fora clay finish between the posts in timber framed buildings. In its purest form, this

technique can be used for visual barriers or windbreaks on terraces and balconies, or for walling in sheds, etc.

Lighter wattlework consists of twigs, often juniper with its needles intact, but birch and heathercan also be used.The juniper is cutaround midsummer, sincethat is when the twigs are toughest and the needles most firmly attached to the bush. The same can be said for birch, which can also be used with the leaves attached.

Branches of about 50 cm in length and 1-1.5 cm thickness are cut and woven between horizontal battens at 20 cm intervals so that each branch lies inside one batten and outside two, forming two layers outside and one layer inside each batten (Figures 15.26 and 15.27). The wattlework is pushed together with a hammer to make it tight. Finally the wall is trimmed. At first the cladding is green; in time it becomes brown and dark grey, and after 30 years so much moss may grow that it becomes green again.

Wattle cladding is as durable as timber cladding. Juniper cladding is particularly good, and has had afunctional lifespan of between 50 and 60 years; and even up to 100 years in the westernfjord landscape of Norway. During a period of this length in this particular area, it is usual to change timber panelling at least twice. A juniper wall also has the advantage of being maintenance-free, but the wall is relatively flammable and sparks from a bonfire orchimney can ignite it.

0 0

Post a comment