Enrichment Planting of Degraded and Secondary Forests

Enrichment planting (also known as line-, strip-, gap-, and under-planting) is defined as the introduction of valuable species to degraded forests without the elimination of valuable individuals already present (Weaver 1987; Lamprecht 1990). Enrichment planting has been suggested as a technique for re storation of overexploited and secondary forests as it can increase total tree volume and the economic value of forests (Weaver 1987, 1993; Sips 1993; Ad-jers et al. 1995). Enrichment of natural forests after logging may be appropriate in areas where natural regeneration is insufficient or soil characteristics are not conducive to other uses (Adjers et al. 1995). Enrichment may also include planting fruit trees or other species with commercial or local value. Enrichment planting can be useful as a technique to establish forest species that cannot grow in open plantations because the trees may suffer from continuous direct insolation (Ashton et al. 1995, 1997 a, 2001; Montagnini et al. 1997). In Box 6.12 we present results of enrichment plantings in over-exploited forests using native species in the subtropical forest of Misiones, Argentina.

Fig. 6.14. Enrichment planting with timber species and with the palm Euterpe edulis in Misiones, Argentina. E. edulis (for heart of palm) has a shorter harvest age (9-10 years) and has high economic value; therefore it can accelerate and increase investment returns of enrichment plantings. (Photo: F. Montagnini)

Fig. 6.14. Enrichment planting with timber species and with the palm Euterpe edulis in Misiones, Argentina. E. edulis (for heart of palm) has a shorter harvest age (9-10 years) and has high economic value; therefore it can accelerate and increase investment returns of enrichment plantings. (Photo: F. Montagnini)

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