Info

09*35 08.00

C02-concentration (Pa/MPa)

C02-concentration (Pa/MPa)

telescope and appropriate computer technology, and using mirrors can provide trace-gas analyses over distances of up to 1.5 km (Fig. 2.10) (Gosz et al. 1988). Of course, this approach is difficult in denser and taller vegetation. New laser sensors, which operate not only in the infrared region of the spectrum but also in the visible and ultraviolet region, allow direct gas analyses from onboard aeroplanes (Matson and Harriss 1988; Matson and Vitousek 1990). Here, the troposphere at the surface of our planet is taken as kind of a gas-exchange cuvette to consider gas-exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The example of Fig. 2.11 shows the separation of different atmospheric CO2 concentrations above various tropical ecosystems along a 50-km-long path of a flight in the morning.

Fig. 2.10 Infrared-radiation source (IR) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), which together with telescopes and a mirror (or a network of mirrors) allow ground-based gas analysis over longer distances. (After Gosz et al. 1988)

Fig. 2.10 Infrared-radiation source (IR) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), which together with telescopes and a mirror (or a network of mirrors) allow ground-based gas analysis over longer distances. (After Gosz et al. 1988)

Fig. 2.11 Horizontal profile of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere above different ecosystems in the tropics based on measurements on board of a meteorological aeroplane along a flight path of a little more than 50 km between 08.30 and 08.43 h. The vegetation has increased the CO2 concentration due to nocturnal respiration. The values above rivers are much lower and correspond to the average CO2 concentration in the troposphere (see also Fig. 2.9). (After Matson and Harriss 1988)

Fig. 2.11 Horizontal profile of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere above different ecosystems in the tropics based on measurements on board of a meteorological aeroplane along a flight path of a little more than 50 km between 08.30 and 08.43 h. The vegetation has increased the CO2 concentration due to nocturnal respiration. The values above rivers are much lower and correspond to the average CO2 concentration in the troposphere (see also Fig. 2.9). (After Matson and Harriss 1988)

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Renewable Energy 101

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable. The usage of renewable energy sources is very important when considering the sustainability of the existing energy usage of the world. While there is currently an abundance of non-renewable energy sources, such as nuclear fuels, these energy sources are depleting. In addition to being a non-renewable supply, the non-renewable energy sources release emissions into the air, which has an adverse effect on the environment.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment