Endangered Species Protection

In 1966, the U.S. Congress passed the Endangered Species Protection Act. Initially, it listed only animal species in need of protection, but the 1973 Endangered Species Act (ESA) made plants and all classes of invertebrates eligible. It also implemented the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which restricted international trade in endangered species.

The ESA defined a species as endangered if it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. In addition, a species is defined as threatened if a species is likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. The act prohibits federal agencies from any actions that would harm a listed species or its "critical habitat.'' Conservation plans and land acquisition were authorized. The ultimate goal of the act is recovery of the species and removal from the list.

Amendments in 1982 required that the determination to add species to the list must be made solely on the basis of biological and trade information. Economic or other effects are not to be considered. However, 1988 amendments required that all reasonably

TABLE 15.24 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Division of Endangered Species, ''Box Score'' of Species Listings and Recovery Plans as of November 1997

Endangered Threatened

TABLE 15.24 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Division of Endangered Species, ''Box Score'' of Species Listings and Recovery Plans as of November 1997

Endangered Threatened

Group

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