Characteristic Of Ignitability

Ignitability is the characteristic used to define as hazardous those wastes that could cause a fire during transport, storage, or disposal. Examples of ignitable wastes include waste oils and used solvents.

A waste exhibits the characteristics of ignitability if a representative sample of the waste has any of the following properties:

1. It is a liquid, other than an aqueous solution containing less than 24% alcohol by volume, and has flash point less than 60°C (140°F), as determined by a Pensky-Martens Closed Cup Tester (using the test method specified in ASTM Standard D-93-79 or D-93-80) or by a Setaflash Closed Cup Tester (using the test method specified in ASTM Standard D-3278-78).

2. It is not a liquid and is capable, under standard temperature and pressure, of causing fire through friction, absorption of moisture, or spontaneous chemical changes and, when ignited, burns so vigorously and persistently that it creates a hazard.

3. It is an ignitable compressed gas as defined in the 49 Code of Federal Regulations 173.300 DOT regulations.

4. It is an oxidizer as defined in the 49 Code of Federal Regulations 173.151 DOT regulations.

A waste that exhibits the characteristic of ignitability but is not listed as a hazardous waste in Subpart D of RCRA has the EPA hazardous waste number of D001.

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