Info

water and risks to humans slight

waters

Source: R.A. Corbitt, 1990, Wastewater disposal, Chap. 6 in Standard handbook of environmental engineering, edited by R.A. Corbitt (New York: McGraw-Hill Publishing Company).

Source: R.A. Corbitt, 1990, Wastewater disposal, Chap. 6 in Standard handbook of environmental engineering, edited by R.A. Corbitt (New York: McGraw-Hill Publishing Company).

of wastewater discharges on the ecological characteristics of the receiving water environment; his topics include the specific effects on phytoplankton, zooplankton, periphy-ton, macrophytic rooted plants, benthic macroinverte-brates, and fish.

Material and energy flow diagrams demonstrate bio-geochemical cycles and system interrelationships. For example, Figure 7.2.5 shows the material and energy flow in an aquatic ecosystem. Food web (or food chain) relationships and energy flow considerations indicate the dy namic aspects of the biological environment. They are also used to develop qualitative and quantitative models of aquatic or terrestrial systems, useful in predicting aquatic impacts of wastewater discharges. Wetland loss or degradation from municipal or industrial wastewater discharges illustrates an ecosystem effect. Such loss or degradation also occurs as a consequence of other human activities or natural occurrences (Mannion and Bowlby 1992).

To analyze the potential effects of wastewater discharges, the engineer may consider environmental cycling

FIG. 7.2.1 Estimated nationwide loadings of selected water pollutants. (Reprinted, with permission, from Corbitt, 1990, Wastewater disposal, Chap. 6 in Standard handbook of environmental engineering, edited by R.A. Corbitt, New York: McGraw-Hill Publishing Company.)
0 0

Post a comment