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Source: Reprinted from J.A. Lager, W.G. Smith, W.G. Lynard, R.M. Finn, and E.J. Finnemore, 1977, Urban stormwater management and technology: updates and users' guide (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), EPA Report 600-8-77-014, Municipal Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, Washington, D.C.). aTotal Kjeldahl nitrogen.

bAfter Galli (1990), peat-sand filters are similar to biological anaerobic-aerobic slow filters. They are applicable for treatment of urban runoff. cBiological treatment is feasible only for CSOs.

Source: Reprinted from J.A. Lager, W.G. Smith, W.G. Lynard, R.M. Finn, and E.J. Finnemore, 1977, Urban stormwater management and technology: updates and users' guide (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), EPA Report 600-8-77-014, Municipal Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, Washington, D.C.). aTotal Kjeldahl nitrogen.

bAfter Galli (1990), peat-sand filters are similar to biological anaerobic-aerobic slow filters. They are applicable for treatment of urban runoff. cBiological treatment is feasible only for CSOs.

the clean effluent. Floatables are directed by a floatable deflector to a floatable trap. The floatable trap is connected to a floatable storage area under the clear overflow weir plate. Floating material is drawn beneath the weir plate by the vortex and dispersed around the downshaft. Floating solids are retained here until after a storm event, when the water level recedes in the swirl chamber. As this occurs, trapped floatables are dropped and enter the foul sewer outlet, where they are transported to a sewage treatment plant.

Overflow K Secondary gutter

FIG. 9.23.1 An isometric view of a swirl regulator-concentrator.

Overflow K Secondary gutter

FIG. 9.23.1 An isometric view of a swirl regulator-concentrator.

A partial list of U.S. installations with experience in swirl-flow regulator-concentrator use was presented by Pisano (1989).

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