References

Code of Federal Regulations. (1 July 1987): Title 40, sec. 261. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 1986. RCRA orientation manual." Office of Solid Waste, Washington, D.C.

| | Chemical Products [ | Petroleum/Coal I^IH Electrical/Gas/Sanitary Primary Metals Machinery | | Other

FIG. 11.2.1. Hazardous waste generation in 1986, classified by industry sector. (Reprinted from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1988, 1986 national survey of hazardous waste treatment, storage, disposal and recycle facilities, EPA/530-SW-88/035.)

| | Chemical Products [ | Petroleum/Coal I^IH Electrical/Gas/Sanitary Primary Metals Machinery | | Other

FIG. 11.2.1. Hazardous waste generation in 1986, classified by industry sector. (Reprinted from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 1988, 1986 national survey of hazardous waste treatment, storage, disposal and recycle facilities, EPA/530-SW-88/035.)

ably on the order of 10 to 100 million tons per year. In relation to the 300+ million tons of commodity chemicals produced annually and the 1000 million tons of petroleum refined annually (C&E News 1991), the mass of hazardous constituents in waste is probably less than 5% of all chemical production.

Examples of basic industries and types of hazardous wastes produced are listed in Table 11.2.1, illustrating the wide range and complexity of the wastes. However, these few examples do not adequately suggest the numbers and kinds of hazardous chemical constituents in hazardous wastes to be managed. There are approximately 750 listed wastes in 40 CFR Part 261, and countless more characteristic wastes. The intensity of industrial competition constantly engenders the introduction of new products, thus wastes are generated at an awesome pace.

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